Opera House presents National Theatre Live’s ‘Salome’

Retelling a story

Submitted Photo: The 1891 Fredonia Opera House will present a new National Theatre production of Salome, captured live via satellite from the stage of London’s Olivier Theatre. It will be presented on Saturday at 1 p.m.

Submitted Photo: The 1891 Fredonia Opera House will present a new National Theatre production of Salome, captured live via satellite from the stage of London’s Olivier Theatre. It will be presented on Saturday at 1 p.m.

The 1891 Fredonia Opera House will present a new National Theatre production of Salome, captured live via satellite from the stage of London’s Olivier Theatre. It will be presented on Saturday at 1 p.m.

The story has been told before, but never like this. An occupied desert nation. A radical from the wilderness on hunger strike. A girl whose mysterious dance will change the course of the world.

This charged retelling turns the infamous Biblical tale on its head, placing the girl we call Salome at the center of a revolution.

Internationally acclaimed theatre director Yael Farber draws on multiple accounts to create her urgent, hypnotic production on the stage of the National Theatre. The Guardian calls it “Epic. A near-perfect production.”

Salome runs approximately two hours, with no intermission. Patrons should be aware that the production contains nudity, and the characters depict and make reference to sexual violence.

Tickets to Salome are $15 ($10 students) and may be purchased in person at the Opera House Box Office or by phone at 679-1891, Tuesday through Friday, 1-5 p.m. They also may be purchased online any time at www.fredopera.org. In addition, Live in HD Series Flex Subscription tickets ($116 for eight tickets) can be used at any of the National Theatre Live productions.

The Opera House is equipped with assistive listening headsets for the hearing-impaired. Simply request one from any usher or Opera House staff member. Headset funding provided by Robert and Marilyn Maytum, the Dunkirk-Fredonia Lions Club, and by a grant from Theatre Development Fund’s TAP Plus program in partnership with the New York State Council on the Arts. Support for the program also comes from the United Arts Appeal of Chautauqua County.

The 1891 Fredonia Opera House is a member-supported not-for-profit performing arts center located in Village Hall in downtown Fredonia. For a complete schedule of events, visit www.fredopera.org.

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