BREAKING NEWS

BREAKING NEWS

Opera House presents Metropolitan Opera’s L’Elisir d’Amore

Submitted Photo: Live at the Met, the Metropolitan Opera’s award-winning series of live, high definition (HD) opera transmissions to theaters around the world, continues its 2017-18 season at the 1891 Fredonia Opera House on Saturday, Feb. 10, at 12 p.m., with Gaetano Donizetti’s romantic comedy of errors L’Elisir d’Amore.

Submitted Photo: Live at the Met, the Metropolitan Opera’s award-winning series of live, high definition (HD) opera transmissions to theaters around the world, continues its 2017-18 season at the 1891 Fredonia Opera House on Saturday, Feb. 10, at 12 p.m., with Gaetano Donizetti’s romantic comedy of errors L’Elisir d’Amore.

Live at the Met, the Metropolitan Opera’s award-winning series of live, high definition opera transmissions to theaters around the world, continues its 2017-18 season at the 1891 Fredonia Opera House on Saturday, Feb. 10, at noon, with Gaetano Donizetti’s romantic comedy of errors L’Elisir d’Amore.

South African Soprano Pretty Yende debuts a new role at the Met as the feisty Adina, opposite Tenor Matthew Polenzani, who enthralled Met audiences in its 2013 production with his ravishing “Una furtive lagrima,” as Nemorino, the simple peasant who falls in love with Adina.

Domingo Hindoyan makes his Met debut conducting the production, which also stars Davide Luciano in his Met debut as Adina’s arrogant fiance, Belcore, and Ildebrando D’Arcangelo as the magic potion-peddling Doctor Dulcamara.

Barlett Sher’s production is charming, with deft comedic timing, but also emotionally revealing. The New York Times praises the production’s “excellent cast of singers … [Pretty Yende] brought a winning combination of elegance and spunk … [and] sang beautifully from the start … Mr. Polenzani was a worthy foil, singing with pliant strength and clarion tone … [He] summoned melting emotion in his second act showpiece, ‘Una furtive lagrima,’ polishing the tone like a fine jewel.”

Live at the Met telecasts are now shown in more than 2,000 theaters in 73 countries, making the Met the only arts institution with an ongoing global art series of this scale. The Met was the first arts company to experiment with this type of broadcast, beginning on a modest scale in 2006 and growing every season since then, with more than 10 million tickets sold to date.

Met Opera stars serve as hosts for the series, conducting live interviews with cast members, crew and production teams, and introducing the popular behind-the-scenes features; altogether, the worldwide audience is given an unprecedented look at what goes into the staging of an opera at one of the world’s great houses.

Individual tickets to each of the operas in the season are $20, ($18 Opera House members, $10 students). A flexible subscription of eight tickets which can be used however you want – one at a time to eight different operas, all at once for eight people, or anything in between – is available for $142. Tickets may be purchased in person at the Opera House Box Office or by phone at 679-1891, Tuesday-Friday, 1-5 p.m. Tickets may be purchased online anytime at www.fredopera.org.

The Opera House is equipped with assistive listening headsets for the hearing-impaired. Simply request one from any usher or Opera House staff member.

The 1891 Fredonia Opera House is a member-supported not-for-profit organization located in Village Hall in downtown Fredonia. For a complete schedule of Fredonia Opera House events, visit www.fredopera.org.

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