Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Former Dunkirk Councilman Randal Goss has accepted a pre-trial settlement in a suit he filed nearly five years ago against the city of Dunkirk in a job discrimination suit. Mr. Goss had sought $500,000 from the city for allegedly violating his civil rights by not hiring him as a fireman in 1991 because he had previously refused to lend support for Michael Bluth in his campaign for city judge. In the complaint, it is alleged that former Public Works Director Michael Bednar told Fire Chief Charles Mancuso in 1990 to keep the firefighter position open and not appoint anyone. When the department became two firefighters short, the positions were filled with lesser qualified individuals from the civil service list, Mr. Goss said. He added, “There was political discrimination. People went around and told other people I didn’t get the job because I didn’t give them the support when they asked for it.”

Thirty years ago – 1986

Pete Christy, grower relations manager for the Cliffstar Corp., in Dunkirk recently announced that Cliffstar is increasing its base price for ripe Concord grapes $10 per ton from $150 to $160 per ton. Christy noted this is a voluntary gesture on Cliffstar’s part. Cliffstar is the only local processor to be paying the increased price of $160 per ton. Christy explained, “Since the early 1900s we’ve had a good working relationship with our growers and hope that through continued fair dealings we and our growers continue this good relationship.”

Forty years ago – 1976

The First United Church of Silver Creek recently honored Douglas Crouse for his service as church organist for the past 17 years. On Sept. 26, Mr. Crouse concluded his present service as organist for the Silver Creek congregation.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Greeting the 2,870 students who arrived on campus and recently began classes at Fredonia State University College were 260 faculty members, among which 56 were new to the staff.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Lisa Yuen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Yuen of Dunkirk, recently competed in the New York State Fair Talent Show in Syracuse as a vocalist. She placed first at the Chautauqua County Fair which enabled her to attend the state fair competition. On the first day of the competition, Lisa placed third in all the acts and on the second day, she placed ninth in the semi-finals. There were more than 300 acts competing for the grand championship. She was one of three vocalists who qualified for the finals. Lisa is a senior at Fredonia High School. She sings in the school chorus and musicals, and will be attending the vocal All-State competition this fall.

Thirty years ago – 1986

From Ad News … Dynamics Unlimited is the name of a new gymnastics facility just recently introduced to the area. It is located in the Masonic Building, 323 Central Ave., Dunkirk and offers all four Olympic events: vault, uneven parallel bars, balance beam and floor exercises. Carole Cotten is the instructor. Dynamics Unlimited offers a newly-installed “spring floor” which makes it unique. … The Gourmet Diners Club of America has presented its 1986 Silver Spoon Award to The Galley, 2 Mullet St., Dunkirk. The club made the award in recognition of the restaurant’s contribution to fine dining.

Forty years ago – 1976

Lt. Gov. Mary Ann Krupsak recently visited Silver Creek during the Festival of Grapes. A luncheon was held in her honor at the White Inn in Fredonia by the Greater Silver Creek Area Chamber of Commerce. She also met with county grape growers to encourage new economic growth in New York state.

Fifty years ago – 1966

The Dunkirk Board of Education gave approval for the renovation of the interior of School 1 on East Fourth Street into administrative offices. The board also approved additions and alterations to School 4 to provide another classroom.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Before a crowd of more than 150 residents, the Westfield Village Board voted against a proposed local law to create historic districts in the village. Many buildings and the village had been entered into the National Register of Historic Places in the early 1980s. The proposed law would have offered some protection to the historic buildings. The law would have required property owners to apply for a permit to make major changes to a building, including partial or total demolition of the structure. The argument was made that an historic district would add to the value of the property and stimulate economic development in the area. Westfield Hospital, among others, was opposed to the adoption of the plan.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Collins Correctional Facility has been a part of the rural Collins community for almost four years. Naturally, there was area concern before its opening, but things have settled down nicely and the prison is being accepted as a member of the community. Concern about the safety of residents living near the prison, jobs at Gowanda Psychiatric Center (which shares the same grounds) and the relationship of the correctional facility to the community appears to have abated. Today an air of tranquility exists.

Forty years ago – 1976

In a dramatic break with tradition, the Episcopal Church has decided to allow women into its sacramental priesthood and episcopate. By a narrow vote, a change in the church’s canon law was approved, making women eligible to become priests and bishops.

Fifty years ago – 1966

In an attempt to alleviate the worsening labor conditions in the northern end of Chautauqua County, three information centers have been established at strategic points to aid incoming laborers in finding employment during the picking season.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Safety in the workplace is first in the mission of the Northern Chautauqua Safety Council. The fledgling group kicked off its 1996-97 schedule of monthly meetings last week with a presentation by state officials on workers’ compensation laws and an update on legislative changes affecting businesses. The NCSC’s goal is to provide an opportunity for safety and training managers at area companies and businesses to increase their understanding of on-the-job safety. The group shares resources on current issues with smaller businesses which otherwise would have limited access to details on the latest developments for improving and maintaining employee safety.

Thirty years ago – 1986

It doesn’t affect the 1986 CCIAC football season, but Gowanda Central football coach Mark Benton spent the week before gathering a gold medal at the Empire State Games. A late substitute, Mark ran leadoff followed by former Buffalo Bills’ defensive back Lou Piccone, ex-Lake Shore track and field standout Perry Jenkins and ex-Dunkirk High runner Jesse Thomas as the foursome set a state record in the 30-39-year-old masters mile.

Forty years ago – 1976

A “Do You Remember?” photo shows the Alco Products Community Chest Workers posed in front of the Alco plant entrance in 1950. Among them are “Skip” Doering, Howard Christy, “Dusty” Miller, Frank Babak, William Trauernicht, Louis Wyszynski, Anthony Strychalski, Harry Rusbuldt, John Gantvoort, Art Ganslow, Edward Halas, Carl VandeVelde and Leo Pakula.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Fredonia State University College is preparing to acquire 70 additional acres of land which will be used for the housing of students and to meet the needs for expanded recreational and physical education activities.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

A call for consolidation as a method to lower the tax rate ties in with the goals of the Chadwick Bay Region group, according to Fredonia Mayor Frank Pagano. “I’m a big proponent of consolidation,” the mayor said. “I think we have too many layers of government (countywide) and we need to reduce the cost. There is no reason we need to have 234 governmental entities in a county of 141,000 people.” He noted that the Chadwick Bay Group is already heading in this direction and that he has had talks with Pomfret Town Supervisor Mark Thomas about doing a study to look at areas for the possible consolidation of services.

Thirty years ago – 1986

A number of Lily Dale residents as well as the Assembly’s ducks are being included in a documentary film currently being made to explain the Spiritualist Religion. The documentary will depict Spiritualism for what it really is, not what others may think it is or what it has been made out to be. All but two of the professional cast are members of the Spiritualist Church. In addition to explaining the philosophy of Spiritualism, the film will also include a reading. Lily Dale Assembly was chosen as the site for the documentary because of its scenery and because it is the oldest Spiritualist camp in the United States.

Forty years ago – 1976

The formation of the “Friends of the Library Committee,” is the first solid indication in months of the start of a fund drive for the construction of a new library for the village of Fredonia. An estimated $300,000 is needed to finance an adequate construction program.

Fifty years ago – 1966

The School of Music at Fredonia State University College has now become one of the largest schools of its kind in the country and is well known throughout the United States for its activities in music in higher education. It has a current enrollment of more than 400 undergraduate and graduate students.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

U.S. Coast Guard officials suspect a distress call from a 14-foot vessel allegedly taking on water on Lake Erie off of Silver Creek to be a hoax. The search for the distressed vessel has been called off. “It’s like people who call false alarms out for the fire department or police department,” said one Coast Guard official. “They think it’s funny. It’s a big joke to them. Problem is it cost over $25,000 for the Coast Guard alone. Helicopters cost over $3,000 an hour.” An entertainment value may have been the reason the call was sent out. “They like to watch the boats out there and watch the helicopters go back and forth,” the official explained. “To them, it’s ‘Ha-ha, we pulled one over on the Coast Guard.'”

Thirty years ago – 1986

Anywhere in New York state and throughout the United States where trotters and pacers entertain nightly, bettors and harness racing fans know the name of Collins. They may not identify the name with the small town near Gowanda, but they should. Dan Gernatt Farms is located in Collins and Dan Sr. puts the name of his hometown on most of the horses he breeds and trains since birth. “In the last 15 years, most of our horses have been named Collins,” smiled the man who has turned his hobby into a half million dollar a year corporation. “It’s helped put Collins on the map.” Roz T. Collins, with earnings of more than $400,000 in four years of racing, is his most notable horse, but Gernatt Farms has nearly 200 horses today and stud fees alon can bring up to $6,000.

Forty years ago – 1976

According to a county report, the best way for Dunkirk to dispose of its solid waste – and perhaps the cheapest both in capital and operating terms – is to truck the bulk of the refuse to Erie County for processing as electric steam generating fuel.

Fifty years ago – 1966

In this year’s “College Edition,” a picture is shown of the “new” Fredonia Normal School under construction following the disastrous 1900 fire. Today, “Old Main” still is very much in use, but its future is slowly becoming a topic of speculation now that the new state teachers college is becoming something of a giant.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Gowanda’s Tom Brockway recently gave his 9-year-old son a valuable and lifelong gift: a different view of the world and an appreciation for helping others. This summer, Mr. Brockway and his son, Montgomery, volunteered with Habitat for Humanity building homes in the impoverished West Indies. They left the United States on July 9, starting their humanitarian efforts in the small village of Guico, Trinidad. In addition to older and more primitive construction methods, the father and son experienced less than modern living conditions. “We had no running water. We used rainwater caught in 55-gallon drums. To shower, we had to pour water over our heads,” Mr. Brockway explained. They moved on to the Dominican Republic, where they helped build more than five homes.

Thirty years ago – 1986

After 14 years of searching, the Historical Society of Dunkirk has acquired an American Locomotive Company/Brooks Works locomotive. The locomotive and the accompanying coal tender will be part of an antique railroad display at the Chautauqua County Fairgrounds. They have been donated by Paul A. Keany, president of Fletcher Granite Company Inc., of West Chelmsford, Mass. The locomotive was completed in Dunkirk in 1916 as Boston and Maine Railroad’s No. 444. After many faithful years on that railroad’s branch lines and yard service, No. 444 was sold in April 1952 to the then H. E. Fletcher Company for use in the granite industry. The locomotive has sat idle for nearly 30 years after being replaced by a diesel switcher in the late 1950s.

Forty years ago – 1976

The appointment of Louis J. Gugino as principal of School 5 was confirmed by the Dunkirk Board of Education at its regular monthly meeting. Mr. Gugino, a native of Fredonia, began teaching in Dunkirk in 1962. The temporary, one-year appointment was approved by a vote of 6-2.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Pope Paul VI, in a dramatic appeal for worldwide peace, today called for an end to the fighting in Southeast Asia and a meeting of “all those responsible” to negotiate a Vietnam peace settlement. This appeal was set down in a 2,000-word encyclical entitled, “Christi Matri Rosarii.”

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

The D & F Players recently presented the first D & F Players/Richard Henneberry Scholarships. This annual scholarship is given in honor of Richard Henneberry, who lost his life in an accident in November 1995. The two area graduates receiving the scholarships are Beth Anne Eppolito and Adriana Lomysh. Beth Anne is the daughter of James and Carolyn Eppolito of Fredonia and a 1996 graduate of Fredonia High School. She is a music education major at Fredonia State University College. Adriana is the daughter of Ms. Marcia Lomysh of Dunkirk and a June graduate of Dunkirk High School. She is currently attending Ithaca College, majoring in vocal performance with a minor in dance/theater.

Thirty years ago – 1986

A prize-winning study on architecture by Daniel D. Reff, professor of art history and chairman of the art department at Fredonia State University College, has been published by the University of Delaware Press. The book, “Small Georgian Houses in England and Virginia: Sources and Development Though the 1750s,” was the winner of the Press’s 1983 competition for “the best manuscript in the field of early American culture prior to 1840.” College President Donald A. MacPhee remarked, “Dr. Reiff’s excellent piece of work is the latest example of scholarly research and publication for which the faculty of the college has become noted. We are very proud of him.”

Forty years ago – 1976

Another primary election has come and gone in the city of Dunkirk and only eight percent of the registered Republicans and Democrats in the city went to the polls to vote for candidates seeking nomination for U.S. senator. The Democrats also had a chance to pick a candidate for state senator.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Holy Cross Seminary on West Lake Road in Dunkirk recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. Taking part in the ceremonies were four priests with a total of 228 years in the priesthood: the Rev. Linus Monahan, CP; the Most Rev. Cuthbert O’Gara, CP; the Rev. Maurice Kanzleiter, CP; and the Rev. Columban Courtman, CP.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Craig Chaytor, of the Ministry of Natural Resources of Ontario, Canada, was loading rabies bait into bins this morning at the Dunkirk Airport. The bait was loaded onto two planes for a planned drop into wildlife areas of Chautauqua County. However, this morning’s rainy weather hampered the plan. Clint Apthorpe, the rabies baiting coordinator for the county Department of Health, said crews were waiting for a break in the weather before beginning the series of five two-hour flights. Mr. Apthorpe is hopeful that the crews will be able to complete the project today.

Thirty years ago – 1986

The work on the replacement of the viaduct on Route 20 in Westfield is on schedule, according to the state Department of Transportation. The new viaduct, which spans the Chautauqua Gorge in the village of Westfield, is slated to be completed by the fall of 1987. The viaduct has been closed to traffic since July. Tri-Delta of Orchard Park, general contractor, is currently finishing the removal of the old viaduct’s structural steel. It is expected that this portion of the almost $7 million state project will be completed this week. The next step will be the forming of footer’s for the new viaduct’s pier work.

Forty years ago – 1976

To provide more comprehensive coverage of news in the village of Westfield, town of Westfield and town of Portland, the OBSERVER is establishing a Westfield bureau. Named to head it is Jerry Kittle, a Jamestown native currently residing in Brocton.

Fifty years ago – 1966

In June, Dunkirk High School had its first representative in the American Abroads program of the American Field Service. Michele Donnelly has returned to Dunkirk after spending two and a half months in Japan during the summer.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

What will it take for Chautauqua County to successfully attract and retain businesses? A 35 percent reduction in local taxes, according to the Northern Chautauqua Chamber of Commerce. The chamber has sent a release to all mayors, supervisors, school superintendents and local state representatives requesting such action be taken. To reach that goal, the chamber concluded consolidation of local governments and school districts should be seriously considered. According to one analysis, Chautauqua County’s property taxes are 35 percent higher compared to five northwestern counties in Pennsylvania. The culprit, according to the analysis, is government spending. Local government spending has grown 205 percent from 1982 to 1993, or 27 percent more than the inflation rate for the same period. The report states that “more demands have to be placed on our schools and governments to reduce costs, to spend less than the rate of inflation and to improve efficiencies.”

Thirty years ago – 1986

The village of Fredonia has earned the American Automobile Association’s Pedestrian Safety Award for its achievement in the prevention of pedestrian fatalities and injuries, the Chautauqua County Automobile Club announced today. The citation is one of 351 top citations to be presented by AAA clubs across the country in the federation’s 47th annual Pedestrian Protection Program. More than 2,619 cities and 23 states participated in the survey. This marks the fifth consecutive year Fredonia has been awarded such a citation.

Forty years ago – 1976

“BOCES is not accountable to our district’s residents – we are,” Cassadaga Valley Central School Board President Guido Guayasamin said at a recent meeting in regard to the New York State’s Department of Audit and Controls report criticizing Chautauqua County BOCES’ poor accounting practices and incomplete records.

Fifty years ago – 1966

For 18 years, Mrs. Emil P. Tederous, 310 Park Ave., Dunkirk has dreamed of returning to visit her family in Lebanon. This summer her dream was realized when Mrs. Tederous and her two children, Helen and Elias, spent seven weeks in her homeland.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Working for legislative change for farming and agriculture as part of the Villenova Grange 604 has long been an important part of Jared and Martha Woolley’s lives. The Woolleys’ family dairy farm, which is also home to nearly 25 sheep, originated back in 1845 with Jared’s great-grandfather, James P. Abbey. Jared’s grandparents were charter members of the Villenova Grange and his parents eventually followed suit. Jared first became a member of the Arkwright Junior Grange and then became a full-fledged member at the minimum age of 14. When the Arkwright Grange closed, they went over to Villenova. Granges were originally founded by town farmers as a means of unity and addressing farming-related concerns. Today, the nearly 70 members of the Villenova Grange celebrate their many accomplishments.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Gowanda Meadows, a 36-unit rental housing development, is nearing completion with plans for occupancy this fall. The one- and two-bedroom apartments are located on a seven-acre site off Buffalo Street and bordered by Union and Seneca streets and Bader Avenue. Sixteen units are designed specifically to accommodate elderly tenants. Completion of the housing complex by the Belmont Management Corp. culminates the company’s effort that began four years ago. The privately-owned rental housing complex has federal funding support through the Farmers Home Administration.

Forty years ago – 1976

The owners of Chimera’s Restaurant are the new owners of the lot where the former St. Anthony’s Church CYO facility was located. The facility was destroyed by fire on Jan. 31, 1975. Chimera’s plans to transform the property into additional parking facilities for the restaurant’s patrons.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Michael Strada, 21-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Strada, 15 Carol Ave., Fredonia and a senior at Fredonia State University College, recently returned from a three-month stay in Europe. He is the subject of a feature story regarding his European adventure.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Statements from city officials expressing support for a downtown location for Chautauqua County’s north offices has at least one business owner in the D & F Plaza upset. “All we’re asking for is a level playing field,” said Phil Pelletter, owner of the Book Nook, explaining that he believes the plaza is not being given fair consideration by city officials. “We’ve got the second-largest taxpayer in the city, but we can’t seem to get anybody to listen to that,” Mr. Pelletter said of the plaza, which is owned by New Realty. “We’re in Dunkirk, even though some people don’t understand that.” The decision over where the county offices will be located will be made by county officials. There are currently between 150 and 200 employees in the north county offices.

Thirty years ago – 1986

For the third time, Sam Baglia, manager of McDonald’s Restaurant on Bennett Road, Fredonia was named a recipient of an Outstanding Manager of the Year award at the annual Pittsburgh Region Managers Convention. The criteria to be met for this award is lengthy and Baglia accomplished it all. He has operated his McDonald’s store consistently at an excellent or higher level of quality standard control throughout the entire year. Mr. Baglia and his wife Cynthia reside on Deer Street in Dunkirk with their son, Matthew.

Forty years ago – 1976

Three years of hard work, months of planning and more than $1 million became a part of history as the Dunkirk Middle School was officially dedicated before a near capacity crowd of school officials, students, parents and members of the Dunkirk School District. The keys to the building, which was the former junior high school, were turned over to Francis Geiben, principal, by the architects.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Parents of pupils in Schools 3 and 5 in Dunkirk attended the recent board of education meeting to express concern over the lack of principals in those two buildings. They were assured that positive action will be taken soon to remedy the situation.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

For the third year in a row, the Brocton Central High School newspaper, The Brocton Review, is the only such publication in New York to be selected as the winner of the George H. Gallup Award. This is the highest honor presented by the Quill and Scroll International Honor Society in judging conducted at the University of Iowa for high school journalist. Six editions of the Brocton Review were presented by co-editors Derek Gee and Amy Pugh for evaluation. According to the paper’s adviser, Dadie Sedota, in order to receive the Gallup Award, a publication must achieve a total point score of 925 out of a possible 1,000 and earn a superior achievement rating in each of five categories. The Brocton Review earned a score of 949.

Thirty years ago – 1986

A valuable painting has been reported stolen in Fredonia. David Palmer of the White Inn, 82 East Main St., reported to Fredonia Police that a painting had been stolen from the second floor hallway. The painting, a landscape, was supposedly painted around 1890. The estimated value of the painting is between $4,000 and $5,000. Police are still investigating the theft.

Forty years ago – 1976

A “People in Profile” features Mary K. (Andrews) Feniello, president of the newly-reorganized Dunkirk Jayncees. A first-grade teacher at School 7, she is dedicated to the young child and the educational opportunities available today. Her interests include ceramics, needlework, refinishing furniture and gardening.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Today has been proclaimed “American Indian Day” in New York State by Gov. Rockefeller to coincide with ceremonies on the Cattaraugus Indian Reservation at Gowanda to memorialize the pioneer missionaries, the Rev. and Mrs. Asher Wright (1803-1875).

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Two-thirds of baby boomer parents who experimented with illegal drugs as they grew up expect their own children will do the same – and many don’t consider that a crisis, according to a survey released today. The findings come just weeks after the government announced a troubling rise in teen drug use. Government figures released last month found that drug use among 12 to 17 year olds rose from 5.3 percent of those surveyed in 1992 to 10.9 percent last year. Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole seized on the data to attack President Clinton as being soft on drugs. Almost half of the parents surveyed – 49 percent had tried marijuana in their youth. Overall, 46 percent of the parents surveyed said they expect their teen to try illegal drugs. But for those parents who had tried marijuana, that number jumped to 62 percent.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Joel Saccamano, 31, of 3322 East Main Road, Dunkirk lost 80 pounds between June and Christmas last year to help him win the 1985 Fitness Center Achievement Award at the Fitness Center on Central Avenue. Joel weighed in at 305 pounds when he joined the fitness center on the recommendation of a friend. He began with three workouts per week and eventually worked up to four.

Forty years ago – 1976

Lucy Hoisington, clerk for the village of Silver Creek, has submitted her letter of retirement to the board, effective Dec. 31. Mrs. Hoisington has served as village clerk for more than 30 years.

Fifty years ago – 1966

After months of planning and groundwork with a number of governmental agencies, the village of Fredonia has reached the point where it authorized the village clerk to advertise the bids for construction of a water treatment plant. Estimated cost of the project is $900,000.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

The Cross Roads Farm and Craft Market Cooperative recently hosted a picnic at the site of the market on Westfield-Sherman Road in Westfield. The Cross Roads will be a local marketplace that will showcase and offer for sale goods and produce produced locally by area farmers and craftsmen. Members hope to attract business from across Western New York and northern Pennsylvania. In July, the organization purchased the property, a beautiful 30-acre site, in order to establish the market. About 80 vendors have joined the cooperative. Members own shares and have a vote in the decision-making process. The Cross Roads is modeled after The Windmill in Penn Yan which has been very successful and has helped to generate revenue for other businesses in its area.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Local Union 106 IBEW is sponsoring Ken Parks of Dunkirk in the weightlifting competition of the National Wheelchair Olympics in Tuscaloosa, Ala., this month. Mr. Parks’ father, Ronald A. Parks, has been a member of the IBEW since 1969. During Mr. Parks’ first attempt in the State Wheelchair Olympics held in June in Long Island, he won the gold medal for bench press and the silver medal for javelin and shot put.

Forty years ago – 1976

Chosen “Man of the Year” by the Hanover Center Fire Company, Charles D’Angelo of York Road, Silver Creek was presented a plaque by Fire Chief Lester H. Manning.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Philip Baideme, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Baideme Jr., 32 Franklin St., Westfield won top honors at the recent statewide 4-H tractor operators contest. Placing in the top 12, Philip will travel to Richmond, Va., in late September for the Eastern U.S. Operators contest.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

According to sports columnist Jerry Reilly, for the first time since the OBSERVER has published records, Fredonia Normal is no longer the victim of the most lopsided football loss in Western New York – and state – history. The new victim? Dunkirk High School. North Tonawanda once beat the Marauders 126-0. Up until this discovery, it was believed that Jamestown’s 121-0 pasting of Fredonia Normal in 1922 was the worst beating a team had ever taken. According to accounts in two newspapers, the DHS game was played on Nov. 4, 1916 at the Felton Avenue Athletic Field in North Tonawanda. It was note that Dunkirk played without the services of three starters in the rout.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Mary Ann Sabato, home economics teacher at Fredonia Central School, has been selected to serve on the 1986-87 New York State Home Economics Regional Leadership Team. In this capacity, Mrs. Sabato will represent Region 10, which includes Allegheny, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie and Niagara counties. The Region 10 leadership team members will act as liaisons between the educators in their region and the New York State Bureau of Career Awareness and Practical Arts for the purpose of facilitating the implementation of the new home economics curriculum.

Forty years ago – 1976

In voicing his opinion of the effect the purchase of AL Tech has had on plant workers, Albin Woloszyn, president of Local 2693 of the United Steel Workers of America said, “Morale has been boosted. Now we know where we stand.” The union leader said he was optimistic about the future of the plant, job security for its employees and possible expansions.

Fifty years ago – 1966

An overcrowding condition at School 3 has resulted in at least 34 pupils from the west town of Dunkirk being transferred to School 7 and a fifth grade being shifted to the old red brick building at the junior high school.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Any unauthorized person walking along railroad tracks in the city of Dunkirk could face trespass charges, as police begin a crackdown on rail property trespassers in an effort to prevent further injuries or even deaths from pedestrian accidents. According to Dunkirk Police Chief John Yannie, the crackdown was prompted by the actions of a man seen lying between the rails early one morning last week on the Norfolk and Southern railroad tracks. The train passed over the man, leaving him with minor injuries, mostly abrasions and bruises to his side, chest and head. Police found the man almost two hours later at a Lord Street residence. The man’s survival on the tracks is unbelievable, Chief Yannie said. There is a small clearance between the cars and the rail bed, but the couplings between the cars decrease the clearance significantly. If debris from the train had struck him or his clothing had been caught, the man would not have been as fortunate.

Thirty years ago – 1986

From Just Between Us ….. The Drum Corps Association Championships were held in Allentown, Pa., recently with the Rochester Crusaders taking fifth place. Marching with the group were Ed Kujawa, Terry Kirst, Michael Howard and Michael Davis, all of Dunkirk. Attending the event were Mr. and Mrs. Richard Riewaldt, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Mackowiak, David Tarnowski, Jeff Logan and Jamie Fellinger, all of Dunkirk.

Forty years ago – 1976

A crowd estimated at 2,000 attended the Polish-American Festival at the Chautauqua County Fairgrounds in Dunkirk. Fine weather prevailed for the outdoor “polka party” featuring Frankie Yankovic, “America’s Polka King.” More than 500 people partook of the Polish dinner, which was held as part of the festival.

Fifty years ago – 1966

The most valuable article found to date during the $3,000,000 Silver Creek sewer project is a Masonic flask which, according to information obtained in McKearin’s Book on American Glass, was likely manufactured more than 137 years ago.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

An ASCAP Award has been presented to Walter S. Hartley of Fredonia, professor emeritus of the Fredonia School of Music. Professor Hartley, the world’s most prolific composer of classical saxophone music, has been selected for the ASCAP Award for 35 consecutive years. The cash awards are made by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers to encourage the writing of serious music. They are based on the prestige value of each writer’s catalog of original compositions, as well as recent performances of those works.

Thirty years ago – 1986

The Dunkirk Urban Renewal Agency granted preferred developer status to two local doctors interested in erecting an office building on the southeast corner of Central Avenue and Third Street. Dr. Bruce Gneshin and Dr. Andre Persaud currently lease space on East Fourth Street, but they need more room. They are proposing a 4,600 square foot, one-story brick building that would be made of brick, mortar block and glass block. In addition to office space for the two doctors, the building would also contain a small gymnasium for a special aerobic exercise program for pregnant women. If all goes according to plans, groundbreaking for construction would be held in the spring.

Forty years ago – 1976

Laura Blakely, 19, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl D. Blakely Jr. of Versailles Road, Irving is the OBSERVER Calendar Girl of the Month. She has been honored for her high achievements in the secretarial sciences at Silver Creek Central School.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Miss Marian Patterson of Dunkirk was the winner of the first place award in the piano recital held during the summer music clinic at Fredonia State University College. Donald Rebic of Fredonia placed second.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Meeting with the county legislature’s Agriculture and Economic Development Committee, the Chadwick Bay region group presented several concerns which it wants to work on. The group’s top priority project is to extend Clinton Street behind the Red Wing plant in Fredonia to connect with Vineyard Drive. The group also proposed the county take over ownership of Vineyard Drive, which has a traffic count of 18,000 vehicles a day. Next on the list is the marketing of the North County Industrial Park in Dunkirk. Dunkirk Mayor Margaret Wuerstle proposed changing its name to “Chadwick Bay Industrial Park,” noting that “the north-south county split is hurting everybody.”

Thirty years ago – 1986

The Forestville Central School Board decided to turn down an opportunity to join the Silver Creek School Board in a study which would explore the feasibility of a merger between the two districts. The feasibility study, for which Silver Creek Central School has indicated its support, would have been a follow-up to the recently completed shared services study the two districts participated in last year. The shared services study was funded through a $20,000 grant provided by the New York State Department of Education. According to the final report on the sharing study, the Forestville and Silver Creek school districts could save money by reorganizing to form one single district and additional grant money would be available to fund such a follow-up study.

Forty years ago – 1976

The Dunkirk Common Council recently approved an agreement that will permit the city to call for bids for the long-awaited boat launch on the west side of the city pier. The agreement gives the city an easement along the shoreline as it existed in 1836, which cuts through the property of Mark’s Restaurant.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Miss Sarah Farkas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Farkas of 36 Lowell Place, Fredonia recently spent six days in New York City representing Fredonia High School at the 17th annual United Nations Pilgrimage for Youth, sponsored by the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the International Association of Rebekah Assemblies.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

The last hurdle to the demolition of the Ford House apparently has been cleared, allowing Brooks Hospital to proceed with its plans to enlarge its parking capacity. The Dunkirk Common Council unanimously voted to override Mayor Margaret Wuerstle’s veto of an earlier council-approved resolution, which directed city attorney Sheila Meck Hyde to discontinue action on the Ford House issue. The legal action was the last remaining obstacle in the hospital’s plans to tear down the house. Mayor Wuerstle’s veto, in part, was to call attention to the failure of the common council to back up zoning laws it approved. “Every time the city is challenged, it backs down and allows itself to be mutilated again,” the mayor said.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Thanks to the efforts of Kenneth Mekus, several improvements have been made recently in Washington Park in Dunkirk. Most notably, a sign has been erected designating the name of the park. The 16 year old, a member of Boy Scout Troop 254 sponsored by St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, has undertaken the improvements as his Eagle Scout Project. He has cleaned the sidewalks, patched the cement by the fountain and also painted the fountain, laid topsoil and planted grass seed in certain areas, and repaired the benches. Kenneth is the son of Mrs. Alice Mekus, 602 Park Ave., Dunkirk.

Forty years ago – 1976

Ron Allessi, magician extraordinaire, doubles as the director of respiratory therapy at both Westfield and Brooks hospitals. A Brocton resident, Ron is a registered member of the Academy of Magical Arts Inc., and has practiced magic for 15 years.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Raymond T. Ryan, Welch Grape Juice Co. president, led the ground-breaking ceremonies for the construction of a three-story addition to the Westfield headquarters, which will conform in design and appearance to that of the present office building built in 1911.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Ethel Rak of Route 20, Silver Creek is pictured standing beside a time capsule recently placed on her property. A Japanese family traveling from Minnesota arrived at her home without warning, Mrs. Rak said, and asked permission to erect the monument. The family placed written documents inside the structure, which is about six feet high and six inches wide. “They were very grateful. They gave my cousins and sister Japanese bookmarks and gave me cookies,” Mrs. Rak said. The time capsule has the words, “May Peace Prevail on Earth,” written in English, Spanish, French and Japanese on each of its four sides.

Thirty years ago – 1986

The law firm of Brown and Kelly of Buffalo has announced that Kevin A. Ricotta of Amherst has become a partner in the firm, effective July 1, 1986. The original firm was established in 1924. The son of New York State Supreme Court Justice and Mrs. Joseph J. Ricotta of 702 Roosevelt Ave., Dunkirk. Ricotta received his juris doctor from Notre Dame Law School in 1982. He has been associated with the law firm since 1983. As of Sept. 1, Brown & Kelly have opened a Southern Tier office in Dunkirk. Mr. Ricotta will maintain practices at both of the firm’s locations, 700 Niagara Frontier Building, 290 Main St., Buffalo and at 429 Central Ave., Dunkirk.

Forty years ago – 1976

Founded in Fredonia in 1910, the Gioia Macaroni Company, which supplies macaroni and other Italian foods from the Western New York area, has been sold to the English company, Ranks Hovis, McDougall Ltd. for an undisclosed amount.

Fifty years ago – 1966

House and Senate negotiators agreed to boost the federal minimum wage to $1.60 an hour by 1968 and to extend wage-hour law coverage to 8.1 million more workers.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

The first non-Native American settler of the town of Hanover and Chautauqua County will be commemorated in a two-day celebration Sept. 21 and 22. Town historian Vincent Martonis is planning separate events in the village of Silver Creek and the community of Irving to honor Amos Sottle, who settled near Cattaraugus Creek in 1796 on land which later became the town of Hanover. He built a primitive cabin and lived off the land, rightfully the first settler of the county. A pictorial post office cancellation and envelope featuring Mr. Sottle and his cabin will be available at the Irving Post Office booth during Grape Fest ’96. A state historical marker commemorating Amos Sottle’s settlement will be unveiled in front of the Irving Post Office building on Erie Street Sept. 22. Among the items on exhibit will be the actual fiddle made by Mr. Sottle during the early 1800s.

Thirty years ago – 1986

From the Reporter’s Notebook ….. Welcome back, Dick! Former Dunkirk Police Officer and ambulance owner/driver Richard Westling, who has been living in Florida for the past seven years, is back in the area for good, he says. He has just started a new job for Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. and reports that “there is no place like the Dunkirk area.” You may have seen Dick’s car around. It is the one with the Florida license plated that says, “Dunkirk.”

Forty years ago – 1976

Investigators working at the scene of the Aug. 30 fire at the Richard Petri storage building on Central Avenue in Silver Creek have reported that arson definitely is connected to the blaze which completely gutted the two-story brick structure.

Fifty years ago – 1966

The U.S. war dead in Vietnam is approaching 5,000. Military spokesmen said American casualties last week totaled 687, including 87 men killed in action. French President Charles DeGaulle bluntly told the United States today to get out of Vietnam. he said the war will continue until Washington follows his advice.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Members of Gowanda’s Zoar Valley Riders Club are celebrating its 50th anniversary. First known as the Moonlight Patrol, the club was founded in 1946 by the late John S. Reid, motorcycle enthusiast and former owner of Gowanda-Harley Davidson Inc. A decade later, the small group was chartered by the American Motorcycle Association and reorganized with its current moniker, the Zoar Valley Riders. It currently consists of 32 active, dues-paying members, representing many professions, generations and western New York communities.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Anyone in the mood for a mouthwatering filet mignon, veal parmesan or dish of shrimp scampi is being advised to head over to Loretto’s Elegant Dining on Route 39 in Forestville. The restaurant, formerly David’s Country Manor, opened for business on Aug. 5 under the new name and according to owner/manager Joseph Campese, the grand opening is being held this weekend. Mr. Campese said the restaurant has been totally remodeled. It is a family-run operation, except for the chef, with all eight children pitching in. The restaurant also caters to parties, weddings and banquets.

Forty years ago – 1976

James P. Subjack resigned recently as the relocation director for the Dunkirk Urban Renewal Agency and will begin a new job as an assistant district attorney in northern Chautauqua County on Sept. 13. He has served as relocation director since January. He will received a salary of $14,200 for the new position, which is not considered a full-time job.

Fifty years ago – 1966

On Aug. 22, a Dunkirk Marine had a part in the nationally-televised Huntley-Brinkley news program seen locally on Channel 2. Pvt. Richard Sells, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Sells of Shore Acres, Dunkirk was one of several Americans wounded in Vietnam who was interviewed on the show. He has been at St. Alban’s Hospital since May. Pvt. Sells joined the Marine Corps in August 1965.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Cassadaga native Warren Fredrickson has worked at the same place since high school in 1953. Now known as Cassadaga Designs, Mr. Fredrickson is fast approaching 47 years on the job, in one form or another. His association with the place he calls “the shop” at an early age can be attributed to the fact that his father, the late Albin Fredrickson, was an owner. He started the business with his brothers, Walter and Delmar, in 1921, when they manufactured furniture frames, seed case displays and bookends. Warren began working full-time at the woodworking business in 1953 and became a partner with his father in 1961. He remained a partner until the business was sold in 1983 to the current owners, Hank Hawkins and Dan hicks.

Thirty years ago – 1986

The new rehabilitation building at the Gowanda Psychiatric Center was dedicated recently before an audience of about 500 persons. On hand for the special occasion were a number of local and state officials, gathering to acknowledge the completion of a $5.3 million building in a dedication ceremony that also honored the memory of the center’s former director, the late Dr. A. Stephen DuBois. For many, the event was a poignant reminder that Dr. DuBois did not live to see the realization of the project to which he had dedicated so much effort. In addition, there was the introduction of John R. Collier, recently appointed to succeed the late Dr. DuBois as the center’s director.

Forty years ago – 1976

“Costs were up and revenues down.” This was the cause of the latest increase in city water rates, according to Dunkirk City Engineer William Larson. He noted that area businesses have used less water in their operations in the last 18 months. The new levy of $8 per quarter for minimum usage is an increase of $2.

Fifty years ago – 1966

“It measures 210 feet long and that’s with the bow section missing.” With this statement, Dick Voigt strengthened his belief that the wreck he has been working on since last summer is in fact the Dean Richmond.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Whitney Cash of Westfield was recently selected as a Universal Cheerleaders Association High School All-Star Cheerleader for the 1996-97 season. She is a senior at Westfield Academy and Central Schools. Whitney was selected from a field of 586 cheerleaders to be one of 75 to try out for the all-star honors. As an all-star, she received a gold medal for her achievement and earned a trip to London, England to perform with the UCA all-star performance team. The announcement was made at the awards ceremony at the Penn State University summer cheerleading camp. Whitney has trained at Margarite’s School of Dance for the past 12 years.

Thirty years ago – 1986

The Polish ship “Stomil” arrived at the Dunkirk Pier at 7:45 this morning en route to its destination in Montreal. Mayor Edwin Gregoreski and Dunkirk officials greeted Capt. Barbara Gajewska and her crew of six at 10 a.m. The crew is from an academic sailing club in Lodz, Poland, and is the second of three crews traveling round trip from Poland. Capt. Gajewska, 38, has been a professional captain since 1977 and said she crossed the Atlantic in a smaller ship than the 43-foot “Somtil.” An informal picnic for the crew will begin at the Kosciuszko Club today. Crew members will visit the Dom Polski, First Ward Falcons and Moniuszko clubs later today. The ship is scheduled to leave Dunkirk tomorrow morning.

Forty years ago – 1976

Having given up on a fourth “preferred developer” for a large downtown shopping mall, the Dunkirk Urban Renewal Agency now is considering piecemeal development of the prime site in the 54.2-acre urban renewal district. The agency voted unanimously to drop HPC Inc. of Latham as the preferred developer. HPC Inc. had been considered by some city officials as Dunkirk’s last hope for construction of a sprawling shopping center under one roof.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Another step forward in the industrial expansion of the Dunkirk-Fredonia area was announced recently. Petri Bakery Products of Silver Creek will expand its present operation and begin the making of several of its products in one of the buildings of the Market Terminal Warehouse on Franklin Avenue in Dunkirk. A 10-year lease has been taken on about 5,000 square feet of space in the building and the manufacture of Petri bakery products in Dunkirk is slated to begin sometime this month.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

An investigation by the Chautauqua County Health Department has determined what has been killing pigeons in an area between Lord and Townsend streets in the city of Dunkirk. The birds have been dying as a result of a baiting program being conducted by Red Wing Co. at its Talcott Street warehouse. The baiting, which is legal, uses a chemical called avitrol to kill the pigeons. The program was started by Red Wing to reduce the pigeon population in the warehouse. The company has promised to increase efforts to pick up the birds that are killed. One resident called the OBSERVER and reported seeing 25 dead birds.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Mr. and Mrs. Benedict Szwejbka and Mr. and Mrs. Donald Felt of the local Catholic Golden Agers took part in a Catholic Golden Agers workshop recently in Washington, D.C. They also attended Mass and participated in the Million Candle Service at the Immaculate Conception Shrine in Washington. Mr. Szwejbka, president of the local group, was chosen to carry one of the offertory gifts and Mr. Felt, treasurer, ushered the members and seated them in church. After the conference, the four traveled to Virginia to visits the Felts’ son and family. En route home, they visited the Shrines of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton and the Grotto of Lourdes and toured the Battlefield of Gettysburg.

Forty years ago – 1976

A good-sized crowd watched as the dedication ceremony of the famous skew railroad arch at Jackson Street in Silver Creek took place recently. William E. Elliott, claims administration manager of Consolidated Rail Corp., spoke on behalf of Conrail in dedicating the arch.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Third Ward Councilman Leonard Catalano touched off a controversy on tree removal after alleging that the city’s streets department has arranged for the removal of stumps along Central Avenue at no cost to the property owners. Other property owners in the area have had to pay for the removal of stumps left between the sidewalk and the curb after the cutting down of diseased and dead elms, according to Councilman Catalano. City Engineer Beecher C. Casson responded that the streets department plans to remove stumps between the sidewalk and the curb throughout the city at no cost to homeowners.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

While progress has been hampered by outside factors, Mayor Margaret Wuerstle said efforts to prepare the Dunkirk Amtrak Stop are continuing. New bids for the renovation of the station at the corner of Main and Third streets are due this week. One area of concern, according to the mayor, are the restrooms at the station. Conrail officials are requesting separate bathroom facilities for its employees. Fourth Ward Councilman John Woloszyn cautioned against spending too much on this project in light of Amtrak’s recent decision to cut service on the Lakeshore Limited. The mayor said Dunkirk is taking part in a one-year trial run and will make use of grant funds for the project.

Thirty years ago – 1986

The Fredonia Rotary Club is sponsoring Sheila R. Gloss as an exchange student to Japan. The daughter of Howard and Patricia Gloss, 714 Park Ave., Dunkirk, Sheila is a 1986 honors graduate of Fredonia High School. While in high school, she was a cheerleader for four years and a participant in the 3-1-3 program with Fredonia State. Interested in language, Sheila is looking forward to studying Japanese. In Japan, she will be staying with the Ishizaki family of Tonami. Upon returning home next July, Sheila plans to continue her education at Fredonia State.

Forty years ago – 1976

HPC Inc. of Latham will present plans for a $2.5-$3-million shopping center between Main, East Third, East Fourth streets and Park Avenue in Dunkirk consisting of 80 boutiques around large “anchor” stores. The center will be covered and will include parking.

Fifty years ago – 1966

John M. Williams, son of Mr. and Mrs. MacLeod Williams of Central Avenue, Dunkirk appeared on TV’s “To Tell The Truth” where he was one of two men impersonating the world champion surf boarder, Rusty Miller. All three men are redheads and about the same size.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

City of Dunkirk officials were outraged at the announcement a deal was struck to keep the city of Buffalo M. Wile plant open and that nothing was done to keep the company’s Dunkirk facility open. When announcing the deal for keeping the doors of the Goodell Street factory open, officials said their decision to close the Dunkirk plant would not change. Dunkirk Development Director Chuck Herron said he made numerous calls to M. Wile officials but was unsuccessful in getting talks started. Mr. Herron said the city also made several offers to help the company even before it announced it was closing its Dunkirk plant.

Thirty years ago – 1986

Buffalo Bills General Manager Bill Polian recently spoke publicly about why his team made quarterback Jim Kelly the National Football League’s highest paid player. Mr. Polian, who was personnel director for the United States Football League’s Chicago Blitz during Kelly’s first season with the Houston Gamblers in 1984, recalled how he watched Kelly throw three touchdown passed in a blizzard. He also recounted throwing a 60-yard touchdown pass after having his helmet knocked off. “That is the kind of talent he has,” Polian explained, and that is why the Bills agreed to pay Kelly some $8 million over the next five years. Bills’ fans, who stayed away from Rich Stadium in such large numbers last season that only Atlanta had worse home attendance, are ready to believe.

Forty years ago – 1976

A monument honoring Dunkirk men who died while serving in the Armed Forces was dedicated recently at Memorial Park. The monument lists those Dunkirk men killed in World War II, Korea and Vietnam, and also lists the names of those who died in accidents or due to illness while serving their country.

Fifty years ago – 1966

The Treasury Department has announced that it would cease printing the two-dollar bill, thus ending 190 years of tradition. Officials said they would discontinue the bills, first printed in 1776, due to “lack of public demand.” Some $139.3 million worth of the two dollar notes are still outstanding, and most of these are in bank vaults and drawers unused. Many people consider the bills unlucky.

Retrospective

Twenty years ago – 1996

Former Silver Creek Police Chief John Yannie’s suit against the village of Silver Creek has been dismissed by Chautauqua County Supreme Court Justice Joseph Gerace. Mr. Yannie, now Dunkirk police chief, sued the village in April and asked for $29,429.47 as compensation for unused sick, holiday, vacation and personal leave time, as well as $50,000 in punitive damages and $10,000 in attorney fees. Mr. Gerace’s seven-page ruling, written Aug. 14, indicates the village of Silver Creek had no resolved policy regarding benefits and compensation for its employees.

Thirty years ago – 1986

The Murraymen Drum and Bugle Corps of Hose Co. No. 4 captured the State Firemen’s Senior Drum and Bugle Championship at Syracuse recently. The Murraymen are proud to bring the championship back to the city of Dunkirk. This marks the ninth time that the Murraymen have captured state championships, winning their first title in 1939 during the World’s Fair in Flushing, Long Island. Other titles were won in Geneva in 1941; New York City (1956); Watertown (1959); Syracuse (1977); Rochester (1979); Schenectady (1981); and Olean (1982).

Forty years ago – 1976

This week’s People in Profile features Betty Speziale, the second woman umpire in Dunkirk’s history. By day, the Forestville native serves as a teller/clerk for the Lake Shore Savings and Loan Co. in Dunkirk.

Fifty years ago – 1966

Dunkirk’s Citizens Advisory Committee recently recommended to Mayor Joseph J. Steger that a new “general retail commercial shopping district” be developed in the city’s urban renewal area east of Park Avenue to Main Street, south of the New York Central Railroad overhead.