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Consensus & Action will define future of Chautauqua Lake

Chamber Corner

Chautauqua County is fortunate to have an abundance of natural resources including scenic tributaries and lakes. These are features that support an excellent quality of life for our residents. Importantly our tributaries and lakes have a profound economic impact on our community. It is for these reasons that we need consensus and action to enhance the condition of Chautauqua Lake. We need to work together to solve many of the problems facing Chautauqua Lake, including excessive weed growth and algae blooms, for both environmental and economic reasons.

The infighting among lake organizations reached a crescendo this past year. Editorials pointing fingers and making accusations coupled with a lawsuit have been a setback for progress toward improving the overall condition. To the credit of each organization, they are striving to enhance Chautauqua Lake and for that they should be commended. In the midst of the animosity it is important to recognize that the various lake groups share that common goal and care deeply about the lake. We hope they put aside organizational battles and instead focus together on their noble objectives.

We support and applaud County Executive George Borrello in his effort to build consensus among the organizations that are working on the health of the lake. We encourage the groups to follow the lead of the County Executive and work together to implement the existing plans. The Chautauqua Lake Watershed Management Plan (CLWMP) and the Chautauqua Lake Macrophyte Management Strategy (CLMMS) work hand in hand to address the serious issues facing Chautauqua Lake. These plans call for a variety of scientifically based strategies both upstream and in-lake. Specifically pertaining to in-lake strategies, the CLMMS identifies a variety of recommended lake management techniques, in detail and by specific zones within the lake. Notably included and recommended in the plan are two techniques around which there has been a great deal of consternation, the use of mechanical harvesting and herbicides. There is validity to both of these strategies. It should not be a battle of either/or when discussing these strategies. The effort and energy should be around how to maximize the capacity of organizations to implement these strategies and adapt emerging innovations and technologies to improve the lake. Maximizing capacity will require strategic use of existing dollars and securing new resources. Being strategic with funds and securing new resources diminishes when organizations fail to work collaboratively.

There is a plan, what is lacking is consensus and an agreed upon business strategy to implement the plan. Among the groups that are working on management of the Lake there is a wealth of knowledge and energy. It is our hope that these groups find a way to direct that knowledge and energy toward working together on their common goal of enhancing Chautauqua Lake.

Last call to VOTE!

Remember to vote daily through Monday for the National Comedy Center in the USA Today 10 Best New Attractions Readers’ Choice Awards. This distinction will draw significant national media attention to our newest Chautauqua County attraction, and increase the number of visitors from all over the country. You can vote at: www.10best.com/awards/travel/best-new-attraction-2018.

Doors Open Jamestown is Jan. 19

The very popular Doors Open Jamestown will be back again on Jan. 19. Doors Open offers free admission for the day to our local attractions, demonstrating the extraordinary tourism opportunities that are right here in our own backyard. Sponsored by the Jamestown Community Chamber of Commerce and the Jamestown Renaissance Corporation, Doors Open has grown substantially since it first began. Participating venues are Jamestown Audubon Nature Center, Busti Grist Mill, Chautauqua Harbor Hotel, Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame, Daughter of the American Revolution, Fenton History Center, Infinity Visual and Performing Arts, James Prendergast Public Library, Lucille Ball Desi Arnaz Museum, Lucille Ball Little Theatre, Martz Kohl Observatory, Marvin Community House, National Comedy Center (preregistration required due to limited capacity), Northwest Arena, Reg Lenna Center for the Arts, Robert H. Jackson Center, Roger Tory Peterson Institute of Natural History, Spire Theater, Tot Spot. The hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for this FREE day at many of our local museums and attractions.

Fredonia Community Chamber Annual Banquet is Jan. 28

The Fredonia Community Chamber of Commerce will hold its Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet on Jan. 28 at Manning’s Fireside Manor, 5377 West Lake Road. The cash bar cocktail hour begins at 5:30, followed by dinner at 6:30. Fredonia Community Chamber Board members and officers for 2019 will be sworn into office during the evening, and awards will be presented for Business of the Year, Business Person of the Year, Community service, Spirit of Fredonia, Outstanding Service, and the From the Ashes Award. The cost is $30 per person with a choice of dinner selections. Reservations are requested by Jan. 22. You can register online at www.chautauquachamber.org or by calling the Chamber at 366-6200.

Chamber Federal Congressional Lunch is Feb. 1

The Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce will once again provide an opportunity for area business people to meet with our Congressman. Representative Tom Reed will participate in the annual Chamber Federal Congressional Luncheon at Webb’s Captain’s Table Restaurant in Mayville at noon, Friday, February 1. We encourage our Chamber members to come with questions for the Congressman. The cost of the luncheon is $20 for Chamber members or $23 for non-members. This event is sponsored by Media One Radio Group, Nestle Purina PetCare, OBSERVER, The Post-Journal, and UPMC Chautauqua. To make reservations, call the Chamber at 366-6200 or 484-1101 or find our event through our online calendar at www.chautauquachamber.org.

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